$ 0.000 0.00%

Infinite Coin (IFC) Rank 428

Market Cap $18.65 M
Volume 24H 0 IFC
Open 24H $0.000
Low/High $0.000 - $0.000
Compare to

Infinitecoin (IFC) is a peer-to-peer open source cryptocurrency that is based on Litecoin (which was in turn inspired by Bitcoin), except that it will have 1142.86 times as many coins, and the difficulty with which coins are produced is adjusted more frequently.

Mkt.Cap $ 18.65 M Volume 24H 0.00000000 IFC
Market share 0% Total Supply 2.15 B IFC
Proof type PoW Open $ 0.0002
Low $ 0.0002 High $ 0.0002
Date Price Volume

Infinitecoin Crypto News


The premise of infinite resources produces a variety of paradoxes in economics. In the martingale betting system, a gambler betting on a tossed coin doubles his bet after every loss, so that an eventual win would cover all losses; this system fails with any finite bankroll. The gambler's ruin concept shows a persistent gambler will go broke, even if the game provides a positive expected value, and no betting system can avoid this inevitability. BankerBankrollExpected value of lotteryConsecutive flips to win max.Attempts for 50% chance to win max.Play time (1 game/minute)Friendly game$100$7. ,130, yearsBill Gates (2015)$79,200,000,000[6]$37.153647,632,711,54990,625 yearsU.S.

Infinite Coin description

The idea of probability weighting resurfaced much later in the work on prospect theory by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. In this method, when the games of infinite number of times are possible, the expected value will be infinity, and in the case of finite, the expected value will be a much smaller value. This solution by Cramer and Bernoulli, however, is not completely satisfying, since the lottery can easily be changed in a way such that the paradox reappears. To this aim, we just need to change the game so that it gives even more rapidly increasing payoffs. For any unbounded utility function, one can find a lottery that allows for a variant of the St. Petersburg paradox, as was first pointed out by Menger (Menger 1934).

This is not applicable for infinitely increasing sums in the St. Petersburg paradox. Nicolas Bernoulli himself proposed an alternative idea for solving the paradox. He conjectured that people will neglect unlikely events (de Montmort 1713). Since in the St. Petersburg lottery only unlikely events yield the high prizes that lead to an infinite expected value, this could resolve the paradox.

Infinite Coin description

Marginal utility and philosophical view

Assuming the game can continue as long as the coin toss results in heads and in particular that the casino has unlimited resources, this sum grows without bound and so the expected win for repeated play is an infinite amount of money. Considering nothing but the expected value of the net change in one's monetary wealth, one should therefore play the game at any price if offered the opportunity. Yet, in published descriptions of the game, many people expressed disbelief in the result. Martin Robert quotes Ian Hacking as saying "few of us would pay even $25 to enter such a game" and says most commentators would agree.[4] The paradox is the discrepancy between what people seem willing to pay to enter the game and the infinite expected value.

Cumulative prospect theory is one popular generalization of expected utility theory that can predict many behavioral regularities (Tversky & Kahneman 1992). However, the overweighting of small probability events introduced in cumulative prospect theory may restore the St. Petersburg paradox. Cumulative prospect theory avoids the St. Petersburg paradox only when the power coefficient of the utility function is lower than the power coefficient of the probability weighting function (Blavatskyy 2005). Intuitively, the utility function must not simply be concave, but it must be concave relative to the probability weighting function to avoid the St. Petersburg paradox. One can argue that the formulas for the prospect theory are obtained in the region of less than $400 (Tversky & Kahneman 1992).

Infinite Coin description

Coin Game with infinite paradox

Even so, the possible discrepancy between theory and reality is far less dramatic. Recently, expected utility theory has been extended to arrive at more behavioral decision models. In some of these new theories, as in cumulative prospect theory, the St. Petersburg paradox again appears in certain cases, even when the utility function is concave, but not if it is bounded (Rieger & Wang 2006). Recently some authors suggested using heuristic parameters [9] (e.g. assessing the possible gains without neglecting the risks of the Saint Petersburg lottery) because of the highly stochastic context of this game (Cappiello 2016). The expected output should therefore be assessed in the limited period where we can likely make our choices and, besides the non-ergodic features (Peters 2011a), considering some inappropriate consequences we could attribute to the expected value (Feller 1968).

Infinite Coin description

How to buy Infinite Coin (IFC) from above-listed exchanges?

  • Even so, the possible discrepancy between theory and reality is far less dramatic.
  • In the martingale betting system, a gambler betting on a tossed coin doubles his bet after every loss, so that an eventual win would cover all losses; this system fails with any finite bankroll.
  • The expected output should therefore be assessed in the limited period where we can likely make our choices and, besides the non-ergodic features (Peters 2011a), considering some inappropriate consequences we could attribute to the expected value (Feller 1968).
  • To this aim, we just need to change the game so that it gives even more rapidly increasing payoffs.
  • You can select some of above exchanges to buy Infinite Coin (IFC) with USD, INR, CAD, EUR, GBP, RUB, etc.
Infinite Coin description

You can select some of above exchanges to buy Infinite Coin (IFC) with USD, INR, CAD, EUR, GBP, RUB, etc. Also, you can use the same exchanges to trade Infinite Coin (IFC) against cryptocurrencies like BTC, ETH, LTC, ETC, XMR, USDT, BNB, etc.

Infinite Coin description

However, unlike Daniel Bernoulli, he did not consider the total wealth of a person, but only the gain by the lottery. This analysis also assumes that each dollar won has equal utility, which is a measure of what a dollar means to you personally.

Infinite Coin description

The St. Petersburg paradox or St. Petersburg lottery[1] is a paradox related to probability and decision theory in economics. It is based on a particular (theoretical) lottery game that leads to a random variable with infinite expected value (i.e., infinite expected payoff) but nevertheless seems to be worth only a very small amount to the participants. The St. Petersburg paradox is a situation where a naive decision criterion which takes only the expected value into account predicts a course of action that presumably no actual person would be willing to take.

Infinite Coin description

The classical resolution of the paradox involved the explicit introduction of a utility function, an expected utility hypothesis, and the presumption of diminishing marginal utility of money. List of Infinite Coin (IFC) exchanges with the real-time price from where you can buy Infinite Coin, Sell Infinite Coin or Trade Infinite Coin (IFC) from fiat currencies like USD, CAD, INR, EUR, etc. or from cryptocurrencies like BTC, ETH, USDT, XMR, LTC, NEO, etc.

Utility of money tends to flatten out for large amounts - a $10 million, for example, is a life-changing amount of money, but the next \$10 million won't have as big an impact on your life as the first \$10 million. The "infinite wager" solution to the St. Petersburg paradox assumes constant utility of money, even though that's not a realistic model of how people behave. You can buy, sell or trade Infinite Coin (IFC) on more than 10 exchange listed above. The total trade volume of Infinite Coin in last 24 hour is around 0 USD.

Infinite Coin description

The Coin Change Problem

Infinite Coin description

This coin grants ninety-nine lives when used in the Super Adventure Box's Game Over room. It must be in your inventory to use it, and it can be reused infinitely. The St. Petersburg paradox and the theory of marginal utility have been highly disputed in the past. For a discussion from the point of view of a philosopher, see (Martin 2004). He demonstrated in a letter to Nicolas Bernoulli[5] that a square root function describing the diminishing marginal benefit of gains can resolve the problem.